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Dozens of countries yet to receive any Covid vaccines

Dozens of countries yet to receive any Covid vaccines
Dozens of countries yet to receive any Covid vaccines


Many poorer countries are scrambling to secure coronavirus vaccines and some, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO), have yet to receive any doses.

The WHO said about a dozen countries – many of them in Africa – are still waiting to get vaccines.

Those last in line on the continent include Chad, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Eritrea, and Tanzania.

At the small hospital where Dr Oumaima Djarma works in Chad’s capital, there are no debates over which coronavirus vaccine is the best. There are simply no vaccines at all.

Not even for the doctors and nurses who care for Covid-19 patients in Chad, one of the least-developed nations in the world where about a third of the country is engulfed by the Sahara desert.

“I find it unfair and unjust, and it is something that saddens me,” the 33-year-old infectious diseases doctor said. “I don’t even have that choice. The first vaccine that comes along that has authorisation, I will take it.”

“Delays and shortages of vaccine supplies are driving African countries to slip further behind the rest of the world in the Covid-19 vaccine rollout and the continent now accounts for only 1% of the vaccines administered worldwide,” the WHO warned on Thursday.

And in places where there are no vaccines, there is also the chance that new and concerning variants could emerge, said Gian Gandhi, Unicef’s Covax co-ordinator for supply division.

“So we should all be concerned about any lack of coverage anywhere in the world,” Mr Gandhi said, urging higher-income countries to donate doses to the nations that are still waiting.

While the total of confirmed Covid-19 cases among them is relatively low compared with the world’s hotspots, health officials say that figure is probably a vast undercount: The countries in Africa still waiting for vaccines are among those least equipped to track infections because of their fragile healthcare systems.

Chad has confirmed only 170 deaths since the pandemic began, but efforts to stop the virus entirely in the country have been elusive. Although the capital’s international airport was closed briefly last year, its first case came via someone who crossed one of Chad’s porous land borders illegally.

Regular flights from Paris and elsewhere have resumed, heightening the chance of increasing the 4,835 already confirmed cases.

The Farcha provincial hospital in N’Djamena is a gleaming new campus in an outlying neighbourhood.

Doctors Without Borders has helped supply oxygen for Covid-19 patients, and the hospital has 13 ventilators. The medics also have plenty of Chinese-made KN95 masks and hand sanitiser. Still, not a single employee has been vaccinated and none has been told when that might be possible.

That was easier to accept at the beginning of the pandemic, Dr Djarma said, because doctors all around the world lacked vaccines. That has changed dramatically after the development of shots in the West and by China and Russia that have gone to other poor African countries.

“When I hear, for example, in some countries that they’ve finished with medical staff and the elderly and are now moving on to other categories, honestly, it saddens me,” Dr Djarma said. “I ask them if they can provide us with these vaccines to at least protect the health workers.

“Everyone dies from this disease, rich or poor,” she says. “Everyone must have the opportunity, the chance to be vaccinated, especially those who are most exposed.”

Covax, the UN-backed programme to ship Covid-19 vaccines worldwide, is aimed at helping low and middle-income countries get access.

A few of the countries, though, including Chad, have expressed concerns about receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine through Covax for fear it might not protect as well against a variant first seen in South Africa.

Chad is expected to get some Pfizer doses next month if it can put in place the cold storage facilities needed to keep that vaccine safe in a country where temperatures soar each day to 43.5C (110F).

Some of the last countries also took more time to meet the requirements for receiving doses, including signing indemnity waivers with manufacturers and having distribution plans in place.

Those delays, though, now mean an even longer wait for places such as Burkina Faso, since a key vaccine manufacturer in India scaled back its global supply because of the catastrophic virus surge there.

“Now with global vaccine supply shortages, stemming in particular from the surge of cases in India and subsequently the Indian government’s sequestration of doses from manufacturers there, Burkina Faso risks even longer delays in receiving the doses it was slated to get,” said Donald Brooks, CEO of a US aid group engaged in the Covid-19 response there known as Initiative: Eau.

Frontline health workers in Burkina Faso say they are not sure why the government has not secured vaccines.

“We would have liked to have had it like other colleagues around the world,” said Chivanot Afavi, a supervising nurse who worked on the front line of the response until recently. “No one really knows what this disease will do to us in the future.”

In Haiti, not a single vaccine has been administered to the more than 11 million people who live in the most impoverished country of the Western hemisphere.

Haiti was due to receive 756,000 doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine via Covax, but government officials said they did not have the infrastructure needed to conserve them and worried about having to throw them away.

Several small island nations in the Pacific also have yet to receive any vaccines, although the lack of outbreaks in some of those places has meant there is less urgency with inoculation campaigns.

Vanuatu, with a population of 300,000, is waiting to receive its first doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine later this month, but it has recorded only three cases of coronavirus, all of them in quarantine.

Associated Press



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Fed’s Williams says US economy does not yet justify policy shift

Fed’s Williams says US economy does not yet justify policy shift
Fed’s Williams says US economy does not yet justify policy shift


A senior Federal Reserve official said the US economy was not yet ready for the central bank to start pulling back its hefty monetary support, even though the outlook has become rosier.

The comments from John Williams, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, were delivered on Monday amid high sensitivity in financial markets to Fed policy. Economic projections by central bank officials last week signalled they expect to increase interest rates in 2023, a year earlier than previously indicated.

Williams said the economy was “getting better all the time”, in some of his most bullish remarks since the pandemic started. But he insisted the Fed would stick to the terms of its monetary policy framework, introduced last August, which sets a high bar for tightening policy.

“It’s clear that the economy is improving at a rapid rate, and the medium-term outlook is very good,” he said.

“But the data and conditions have not progressed enough for the Federal Open Market Committee to shift its monetary policy stance of strong support for the economic recovery.”

The comments came ahead of Jay Powell’s scheduled testimony in Congress on Tuesday. In the Fed chair’s prepared remarks, released late on Monday, Powell pointed to “sustained improvement” in the economy but highlighted the “uneven” pace of the recovery in the labour market and lingering risks from the pandemic, including the slowdown in the rate of US vaccinations.

The Fed chair added that “inflation is expected to drop back toward our longer-run goal”, reiterating his view that the current surge in consumer prices will be transitory.

Both Powell’s prepared testimony and Williams’ remarks suggest the top brass at the Fed are more cautious on the prospect of a quick policy change compared to those of some of the other regional bank presidents who have made comments after last week’s FOMC meeting.

Speaking to CNBC on Friday, James Bullard, the president of the St Louis Fed, suggested the central bank might be ready to increase interest rates as early as next year, sparking a sharp sell-off in US stocks.

Williams told an event hosted by the Midsize Bank Coalition of America that interest rates would not be raised until full employment was reached and inflation had risen to 2 per cent and was “on track” to exceed that target moderately for some time.

He also said that any tapering of the Fed’s $120bn monthly asset purchases would not take place until “substantial further progress” had been made on those fronts.

And later, in response to questions from reporters after the event, he said there were both upside and downside risks to employment and the Fed’s inflation 2 per cent target. “It’s still a very uncertain outlook and we have to take that into account in how we think about policy decisions going forward,” he said.

On Monday, at an event hosted by Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum, a think-tank, Bullard reiterated the need for the Fed to begin considering scaling back its bond purchases in the face of higher inflation. 

Robert Kaplan, Dallas Fed chair, struck a similar tone at the same event.

“It would be healthier as we are making progress in weathering the pandemic and achieving our goals to start adjusting these purchases — Treasuries and mortgage-backed securities — sooner rather than later,” Kaplan said.



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The farmers burning their own crops to fight a mouse plague

The farmers burning their own crops to fight a mouse plague
The farmers burning their own crops to fight a mouse plague



Colin Tink, 63, has been farming all his life and has never experienced a mouse plague like the one ravaging Australia‘s eastern grain belt. Nor a drought like the one that preceded it, which turned fertile crop areas into dust bowls.

When the rains finally came last year, Mr Tink thought his fortunes were changing.

The rain led to bumper crops through the spring and summer months (September to March in the Southern Hemisphere). Silos are overflowing with grain. And barns are piled high with hay. Mr Tink grew enough hay to feed his cattle for two years.

Then the mice arrived. Thousands of them.

The vermin burrow deep into his hay. What they don’t eat is ruined anyway as their urine trickles down through the bales. The smell is acrid. It sticks in your nose and lingers on your clothes.

“It breaks your heart a bit,” Mr Tink said. “We’re back to square one.”



When I wake up in the morning I am talking about mice and then when I go to bed I am still talking about mice

Not one to give up, Mr Tink recently fashioned a giant mouse trap out of a shipping container he uses to roll out grain for his cattle. He lures mice into the container by scattering grain on the floor.

Then, Mr Tink, or his five-year-old grandson, Jock, sweep the mice with a broom toward a pool of water positioned at the open end of the container. The rodents hurtle into the water. Trapped by a thin layer of dishwashing liquid, they quickly drown.

On the first evening, they caught 7,000 mice. The next night it was 3,000. Now, they’re averaging about 1,000 a night.

“We won’t beat ’em but we might slow them down a bit,” Mr Tink said.

Australia suffers a mouse plague every decade or so. Some older farmers recall an infestation during the 1970s in which the ground felt as if it was moving, it was so thick with mice.

Approximately 7000 mice, caught using a homemade water trap by Colin Tink, lie in a field near Dubbo, New South Wales, Australia on 24 May 2021

(Matthew Abbott)

One contributing factor is changing farming practices. To maintain moisture in Australia’s arid soil, farmers are sowing new crops directly onto the old stalks that were left in the ground.

That means mice have more places to shelter – and have more food.

The New South Wales government has secured 5,000 litres (1,320 gallons) of a deadly bait called bromadiolone. Scientists worry the poison may inadvertently kill other species – wedge-tailed eagles, owls, snakes and goannas (large lizards) that are feeding on the abundant mouse prey.

The mice also carry viruses that are potentially deadly to humans. Health authorities in Queensland state say the number of cases of leptospirosis – a flu-like illness that can lead to meningitis, kidney failure, bleeding and respiratory complications – have almost doubled in 2021 compared with this time last year.

Dead and drowning mice float in a homemade trap near Dubbo, New South Wales, Australia on 26 May 2021

(Matthew Abbott)

With a shortage of traps, farmers have had to come up with their own systems to catch mice.

They’re crafting makeshift traps out of barrels and buckets. They’re laying down treats to tempt the mice to scuttle to their doom.

Some farmers have enlisted the help of experts like Henry, a government scientist who roams the country advising people on how to deal with the rodents.

In Coonamble, west of Sydney, last month, Henry inspected a 3,000 bale haystack – worth roughly $93,000 (£67,000) at current prices – that had been destroyed by mice. In a drought, the straw would fetch twice that, he said.

Mark Iles, publican at the Royal Hotel, holds a dead mouse in Yoeval, New South Wales, Australia on 28 May 2021

(Matthew Abbott)

“When I wake up in the morning I am talking about mice and then when I go to bed I am still talking about mice,” he said.

At the Royal Hotel in Yeoval, about 200 miles west of Sydney, the publican, Mark Iles, said he was catching mice in his bare hands a few weeks ago as they scampered across his bar.

Greg Younghusband is a 40-year-old farmer near Gilgandra, about 270 miles west of Sydney. In dealing with the infestation, he has had to burn his own crops and set up scores of traps.

One Saturday about a month ago, things got so bad that Mr Younghusband had to send his wife and daughters away to a nearby town for the weekend. The mouse invasion was too much to bear.

Colin Tink, inside his giant homemade mouse trap, pushes mice into a bath to drown the mice near Dubbo, New South Wales, Australia 26 May 2021

(Matthew Abbott)

They were in his shed. They were in the house. They destroyed his washing machine, dryer and two refrigerators. They chewed through his couch, his coffee machine and his daughter’s bed sheets. They were under the oven.

He could hear them in the walls. He also smelled them. The smell of death. Everywhere.

“You can’t get rid of the smell because they die in the walls. They die under the stove,” Mr Younghusband said. “It’s the worst smell you’ve ever smelt. It’s unbelievable.”

He armed himself with 40 traps and between 2pm and 2am he caught 450 mice, before giving up and going to bed. “I’d unload a trap and bait it again and as soon as I turned away it would go off again.”

An agriculture supply shop has completely run out of mouse bait and traps in Wellington, New South Wales, Australia on 28 May 2021

(Matthew Abbott)

One recent evening, Mr Younghusband lit a fire under about 130 hay bales that had been destroyed by mice and stood back to watch, beer in hand, as flames lit up the night sky. He estimates he has lost about 1,500 bales so far.

Normally a mouse plague will end apocalyptically, according to Henry, as the population grows too big to support itself. Riddled with disease and running out of food, the vermin turn on each other, starting with the sickest and weakest.

He worries that if temperatures don’t drop sharply enough over the winter, many will survive the cooler months, setting up for an even more explosive outbreak next spring.

© The Washington Post



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Amal Clooney ensures justice for Yazidi girl, 14, raped while an ISIS slave

Amal Clooney ensures justice for Yazidi girl, 14, raped while an ISIS slave
Amal Clooney ensures justice for Yazidi girl, 14, raped while an ISIS slave


Amal Clooney ensures justice for Yazidi girl, 14, raped while an ISIS slave, with successful prosecution of jihadi bride who oversaw victim’s abuse

  • Clooney represented one of three victims in trial against ISIS bride in Dusseldorf
  • Her client was 1 of 7 Yazidi girls enslaved by defendant named only as Sarah O.
  • Sarah O., 23, who holds Algerian nationality, married ISIS fighter in Syria in 2013
  • She beat the Yazidi slaves and helped to ‘prepare them’ for rape by her husband










Amal Clooney has secured justice for a Yazidi woman who was raped from the age of 14 after being enslaved by ISIS in Syria.

Clooney was representing the woman as one of three victims of an ISIS bride named only as Sarah O, who was jailed for six-and-a-half years in Dusseldorf on Wednesday.

The 23-year-old, who holds Algerian nationality, travelled to Syria as a teenager in 2013 where she married a German-Turkish national named only as Ismail S., who remains at large.

From 2015, the couple started enslaving Yazidi women and girls who were kidnapped by marauding ISIS fighters and sold throughout the ‘caliphate.’

The Yazidi ethnic group, who are mostly based in Iraq, faced genocidal persecution by Islamic State which claims they are a race of ‘devil worshippers.’ 

Amal Clooney ensures justice for Yazidi girl, 14, raped while an ISIS slave

Amal Clooney is pictured at the United Nations Security Council during a meeting about sexual violence in conflict in New York in April, 2019

Over two years, Sarah O. and Ismail S. enslaved seven Yazidi women, some of whom were sold onto others, while another, a 14-year-old girl, died in captivity.

Sarah O. beat the prisoners and helped her husband sexually abuse at least two of the victims, helping to ‘prepare them’ for rape.

She also forced the Yazidis to carry out slave labour at her house.

The couple were arrested in Turkey in February 2018. After seven months in custody, Sarah O. was deported to Germany and her trial began in October 2019.

The proceedings were closed to the public because she was a teenager when some of the events took place. In accordance with German law, her full name has not been released either.

The victim represented by Clooney, along with her German colleagues, Natalie von Wistinghausen and Sonka Mehner, was present in Dusseldorf on Wednesday when judges announced the verdict.

Following the judgment, the victim said: ‘No conviction can make up for our suffering, but I am immensely grateful to the German Federal Prosecutors and the German court for investigating and shedding light on the crimes committed against the Yazidis and I hope that many more countries will follow this good example.’ 

Sarah O. was convicted of membership in a foreign terrorist organisation, assault, deprivation of liberty, aiding and abetting rape, enslavement and religious and gender-based persecution as crimes against humanity. 

Clooney’s German colleague Sonka Mehner said: ‘Thanks to the victims, the full extent of the defendant’s criminal conduct could be established.’ 

George Clooney and his wife Amal Clooney attend the "Money Monster" premiere during the 69th annual Cannes Film Festival in 2016

George Clooney and his wife Amal Clooney attend the ‘Money Monster’ premiere during the 69th annual Cannes Film Festival in 2016

The other German attorney representing the Yazidi woman, Natalie von Wistinghausen, added that ‘for the first time ever, a court handed down a conviction for religious and gender-based persecution and this recognition is of utmost importance for our client and for all Yazidi women, for their religious community as a whole, as well as for other victims of gender-based violence.’

Clooney, the 43-year-old wife of Hollywood actor George, is a barrister who specialises in international criminal and human rights law.

She was called to the London Bar in 2010 after being called in New York in 2002.

Fluent in French and Arabic, she has worked in The Hague including at the International Court of Justice.

In addition to her legal work, she served as a senior adviser to Kofi Annan when he was the UN’s Envoy on Syria. 



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Carl Nassib becomes the first active NFL player to come out as gay

Carl Nassib becomes the first active NFL player to come out as gay
Carl Nassib becomes the first active NFL player to come out as gay



Carl Nassib has become the first active NFL player to come out as gay, after he made the announcement in an Instagram video.

“What’s up, people. I’m Carl Nassib. I’m at my house here in West Chester, Pennsylvania. I just wanted to take a quick moment to say that I’m gay,” Nassib, a defensive lineman, said in the video.

“I’ve been meaning to do this for a while now, but I finally feel comfortable enough to get it off my chest.”

Nassib, 28, told his followers that he hoped that people would not have to make similar videos in the future and announced he was donating $100,000 to the Trevor Project, which aims to prevent suicide among LGBTQ+ youths.

“I’m a pretty private person so I hope you guys know that I’m really not doing this for attention. I just think that representation and visibility are so important,” he said.

“I actually hope that like one day, videos like this and the whole coming-out process are just not necessary.

“But until then, I’m going to do my best and do my part to cultivate a culture that’s accepting, that’s compassionate and I’m going to start by donating $100,000 to the Trevor Project.”

In an online written message, Nassib said he had “agonised over this moment for the last 15 years” and decided to go public with the support of his family and friends.

Nassib signed for the Raiders in 2020 on a three-year, $25m free-agent deal, with $16.75m of his money guaranteed.

The team’s official Twitter account posted a black heart symbol and said: “Proud of you, Carl.”

Last season he had 2.5 sacks and an interception in 14 games.

He was selected in the third round of the 2016 NFL drat by the Cleveland Browns, after playing his college career at Penn State, and has also played for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

Former New England Patriot’s receiver Julian Edelman took to Twitter to congratulate Nassib.

“Awesome moment. Spreading the love to the Trevor Project very classy move,” tweeted Edelman.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, also welcomed the announcement.

“The NFL family is proud of Carl for courageously sharing his truth today. Representation matters,” said Mr Goodell.

“We share his hope that someday soon statements like this will no longer be newsworthy as we march toward full equality for the LGBTQ+ community. We wish Carl the best of luck this coming season.”



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Brexit poll shows ‘limited enthusiasm’ for UK-EU trade deal

Brexit poll shows ‘limited enthusiasm’ for UK-EU trade deal
Brexit poll shows ‘limited enthusiasm’ for UK-EU trade deal


British voters have “limited enthusiasm” for the post-Brexit agreement Boris Johnson’s government negotiated with the EU last year, with only one in five describing it as a “good” deal, a survey has found.

However, ahead of the fifth anniversary of the 2016 EU referendum on Wednesday, the poll also found that years of divisive political debate had changed few minds — with four out five people who voted saying they would still vote the same way.

Sir John Curtice, politics professor at Strathclyde university, who led the research for the polling group What UK Thinks and the National Centre for Social Research (NatCen), said the findings were “far from a ringing endorsement” of the Brexit trade deal.

“Five years on, it is difficult to argue that the Brexit referendum has been an unalloyed success,” Curtice wrote, noting Leavers’ limited enthusiasm for the Brexit deal. At the same time, he added, the outcome had reconciled few Remain voters to the Brexit project.

The overall tepid response to the trade deal negotiated by Lord David Frost last year found that even among Leave voters, only one in three felt it was a “good” deal, although that figure reflected the fact that some Leave voters would have preferred to have left the EU on even harder terms, with no deal at all.

Column chart of Per cent showing Enthusiasm is limited for the UK's post-Brexit deal with Brussels

The survey was conducted just weeks after the UK left the EU single market on January 1 and is the latest in a rolling series of polls that have been conducted by What UK Think and NatCen since 2016.

The UK-EU Trade and Co-operation Agreement (TCA) did not trigger the significant disruption predicted for UK ports this January, but did cause UK exports to the EU to fall sharply in some sectors such as agrifood, where exports fell by nearly 50 per cent in the first quarter of this year compared to 2019 and 2020. 

Other broader impacts, particularly on professional services and travel, have to some extent been masked by Covid-19, which has sharply reduced leisure and business travel to Europe this year. 

Despite misgivings about the post-Brexit deal, the poll continued to vindicate Johnson’s decision to make good on his 2019 election promise to “get Brexit done”, with dissatisfaction with the UK government’s handling of Brexit falling from a peak of 88 per cent in autumn 2019 during the period of prolonged parliamentary stalemate, to about 50 per cent today.

“The confidence that Leave voters had in the UK government was badly shaken when it appeared that Brexit might not happen, but it has now largely been restored,” Curtice wrote. 

At the same time, the survey found that three out of four Leave voters now expect either immigration to fall or that the economy will be better off — two key metrics of Brexit — indicating that for many voters, “the detail of Brexit matters less than the principle”.

As for whether a rerun of the 2016 Referendum today would see a different result, the poll found it probably would not.

While a clear majority of those who did not vote in 2016 say they would now vote to rejoin the EU, they are likely to be cancelled out by the number of Remain voters who — even though they still wished the UK had remained a member of the EU — would not now vote because of the further upheaval of rejoining. 

“We estimate that a referendum held now on ‘rejoin’ versus ‘stay out’ could well produce a narrow majority (52%) in favour of staying out,” Curtice said.

Looking to the future, Curtice said it was not clear whether public opinion would swing if future difficulties with the UK-EU TCA emerged once Covid-19 restrictions were lifted in the coming months. 

Much would depend on whether the opposition Labour party, which has so far been reluctant to campaign on Brexit issues for fear of alienating Leave voters in target constituencies, was prepared to make an issue of Brexit in the future.

“Proof of the Brexit pudding will be in the eating, and the main course has been delayed by the pandemic,” Curtice told the FT.

“To make a difference, the government’s record will have to be criticised and that will depend on the extent to which the opposition is willing to tackle what they regard as the operational failures of Brexit.”



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St Louis sues Missouri over new gun laws as state records deadliest year in its history

St Louis sues Missouri over new gun laws as state records deadliest year in its history
St Louis sues Missouri over new gun laws as state records deadliest year in its history



Both the city and county of St Louis filed a lawsuit against Missouri in an attempt to block the creation of an effective sanctuary state for the Second Amendment.

The injunction filed in the Cole County Circuit Court seeks to overturn the recently-signed “Second Amendment Preservation Act” that prevents local authorities from enforcing federal gun control laws.

Under the new law signed by Republican Governor Mike Parson, state and local law enforcement agencies can be fined about $50,000 per any officer who knowingly enforces federal gun law. It also “voids” any federal law, executive order, or regulation to track or remove firearms from citizens in Missouri.

Democrat mayor of St Louis, Tishaura Jones, said 2020 was the deadliest year for gun violence in the state’s history, and the deadliest in St Louis in half a century.

“And now the Missouri legislature is throwing up barriers to stop police from doing their most important job —preventing and solving violent crime,” she said in a statement to KMOV4.

“This harmful and unconstitutional law takes away tools our communities need to prevent gun violence.”

Philip Dupuis, police chief in the St Louis suburb of O’Fallon, resigned in protest over the new law, saying the poorly worded language removes sovereign immunity and allowed officers to be sued for good faith seizures of firearms in emergency circumstances.

Mr Parson, however, said the law was designed to protect “law-abiding Missourians” against government overreach and unconstitutional federal mandates.

“We will reject any attempt by the federal government to circumvent the fundamental right Missourians have to keep and bear arms to protect themselves and their property,” he said in a statement.

The injunction, filed against Missouri and the state’s Attorney General, Eric Schmitt, that the law, HB 85, violates the US Constitution’s Supremacy Clause, which provides that federal law preempts state law.

It says the law also violates the Missouri Constitution in several ways, including an infringement of the separation of powers of the branches of state government.

“In misguided seal to prevent imaginary threats to the right to keep and bear arms, the political branches in our state government blatantly violated the federal and state constitutions by attempting to nullify federal gun laws,” the lawsuit says.

“The consequences of HB 85 are tangible and real: they will make it easier for criminals to use guns in committing violent acts, they will give gun violence a safe haven in Missouri, local governments… may be disqualified from receiving federal grants and technical assistance through the United States Department of Justice.”

The Department of Justice, for its part, warned Missouri officials that the US Constitution’s Supremacy Claus trumped the new bill signed into law on Saturday.

Acting assistant attorney general Brian Boynton wrote in a letter to the governor that the law would disrupt the working relationship between federal and local law enforcement agencies.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.



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