Connect with us

TECH

Facebook strikes deal with Australia to restore news on platform

Avatar

Published

on

Shaw Academy


Facebook has agreed to restore Australian news on its platform following an agreement with the government on amendments to a draft law that would force Big Tech to pay for news.

Chic Me - World

The social media company said on Tuesday it was satisfied that changes and guarantees agreed with Canberra addressed its “concerns about allowing commercial deals that recognize the value our platform provides to publishers relative to the value we receive from them”.

“As a result of these changes, we can now work to further our investment in public interest journalism and restore news on Facebook for Australians in the coming days,” it added.

Canberra said the amendments to the proposed law would provide clarity for digital platforms and news media businesses about how the code would operate.

Danone

“Facebook has refriended Australia, and Australian news will be restored to the Facebook platform,” said Josh Frydenberg, Australia’s treasurer. “Facebook has committed to entering into good faith negotiations with Australian news media businesses and seeking to reach agreements to pay for content.”

The agreement follows a public backlash in Australia after Facebook last week blocked the sharing of all news on its platform in the country. The abrupt decision was made without notice and inadvertently cut off access to critical emergency services and health pages.

The amendments to the bill included measures that could give Facebook and Google, the platforms most vulnerable to the code, more flexibility to avoid being designated under it by the government. For example, the code will have to take into consideration whether a digital platform has made a significant contribution to the news industry by reaching commercial deals with media businesses.

Zalora Hong Kong

A contentious final arbitration model contained in the code will be stipulated as a “last resort” option when commercial deals cannot be reached. A two-month period of mediation must occur prior to arbitration, the government said.

Google has struck a number of deals with Australian media companies, including Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp and Nine, owner of the Sydney Morning Herald.

Nine said it was pleased the government had reached a compromise “to move Facebook back into the negotiations with Australian media organisations”. The company said it looked forward to constructive discussions resuming with the tech group.

The Financial Times has reached commercial agreements for news with Google and Facebook.

Chic Me - World



Source link

Rosegal
Advertisement
Click to comment

TECH

Neumann agrees to 50% reduction in SoftBank settlement over WeWork

Tama Putranto

Published

on

Shaw Academy


Adam Neumann has agreed to a 50 per cent reduction on the payout he will receive from WeWork’s largest investor SoftBank, ending a legal battle and paving the way for the shared office provider to go public.

Chic Me - World

SoftBank said on Friday it had entered a settlement agreement with Neumann and two WeWork board directors, who had sued SoftBank over the Japanese group’s reluctance to execute a $3bn tender offer it promised as part of a rescue package for the company.

The agreement comes 18 months after a botched initial public offering that brought WeWork to the brink of bankruptcy, following a series of high-profile blunders that led to Neumann’s resignation as chief executive.

Under the terms of the deal, SoftBank would spend $1.5bn to purchase shares from Neumann, WeWork employees and other investors in the company, including the venture group Benchmark Capital, according to people briefed on the matter. Neumann can sell up to $500m in shares in the deal.

Danone

SoftBank had initially planned to purchase double that amount as part of a multibillion-dollar rescue package in October 2019 but later reneged on the tender offer, claiming WeWork had failed to meet a set of conditions behind the rescue deal.

Marcelo Claure, executive chairman of WeWork, said the settlement was “the result of all parties coming to the table for the sake of doing what is best for the future of WeWork”.

Settling the dispute with Neumann was critical for allowing WeWork to potentially merge with a listed blank cheque company that would allow it to trade on public markets, said a person with direct knowledge of the matter. 

Zalora Hong Kong

SoftBank is currently in talks with BowX Acquisition, a special purpose acquisition company that raised $420m in an IPO in August, about a merger that could value WeWork between $8bn and $10bn, said people familiar with the matter.

The talks have been active for several weeks, and a deal could be announced soon, although one person involved in the negotiations said WeWork could still opt to go public through a traditional IPO or a direct listing.

The new valuation would be a far cry from the $47bn mark WeWork hit in a round of financing it secured before the company faced criticism from investors over its huge losses, governance matters and revelations that Neumann was personally benefiting from a series of deals. 

Neumann would have no role in the running of WeWork, nor would he have a seat on the company’s board of directors, said people briefed on the settlement. However, he would retain most of his stake in the company. 

Chic Me - World



Source link

Rosegal
Continue Reading

TECH

Robinhood in talks with Wall Street regulator Finra over probe

Tama Putranto

Published

on

Shaw Academy


Robinhood is in talks with a Wall Street regulator to settle an investigation into outages in March last year and its options trading processes, as the trading platform favoured by retail investors grapples with a string of regulatory troubles.

Chic Me - World

The Securities and Exchange Commission, several state regulatory authorities and Wall Street’s self-regulatory body Finra are examining how the trading platform “displays cash and buying power to customers and its options trading approval process”, Robinhood said in a regulatory filing on Friday.

The company said it was in talks with staff at Finra, or the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, about a possible resolution of the investigation and that it expected to pay a fine as part of any potential settlement.

Robinhood has become a target of regulators and lawmakers as its popularity has exploded. The company’s chief executive, Vlad Tenev, squared off for hours with a congressional committee last week over its role in the GameStop saga, over trading restrictions the company put in place during the peak of the share buying frenzy, and the consequences of its alleged “gamification” of investing.

Danone

Even before the “meme stock” mania, Robinhood had already faced a series of regulatory troubles. In December the company agreed to pay $65m to settle charges from the SEC that it had failed to provide its customer with the best trading prices through its platform.

In March last year, as global stock markets began to tumble over the rapid spread of the coronavirus, Robinhood had three outages over the course of a week, drawing a backlash from its customers.

Robinhood also faces a lawsuit from the family of Alex Kearns, a 20-year old trader who committed suicide last summer after believing he lost more than $700,000 after a complicated options trade on the app.

Zalora Hong Kong

Finra and Robinhood both declined to comment on the disclosure on Friday.

In a continuation of the fall out from the GameStop saga, the SEC also said on Friday that it was halting trading in 15 companies because of “questionable trading and social media activity”. The list of companies included Bebida Beverage, Helix Wind, MediaTechnics and Marani Brands, all of which trade as penny stocks.

The regulator already suspended trading in a handful of other companies earlier this month.



Source link

Chic Me - World

Rosegal
Continue Reading

TECH

Scientists create ‘smart tattoo’ that could pave the way to phone on your skin

Avatar

Published

on

Shaw Academy


Chic Me - World

If you’re sick of having to carry your phone around, groundbreaking technology could let you send emails, shop online and browse dating apps – on your own skin.

Scientists have engineered a temporary light-emitting tattoo that could pave the way for future smart tattoos that perform all kinds of tasks while sitting on someone’s body.

Researchers at University College London (UCL) and the Italian Institute of Technology (IIT) created the tattoo which uses the same light-emitting technology used in TV and smartphone screens.

Danone

It’s designed to be applied the same way as the temporary tattoos of butterflies and superheroes that are popular among children.

science
The light-emitting tattoos are applied the same way as a temporary tattoo

The light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are fabricated onto temporary tattoo paper and transferred to a new surface by being pressed onto the skin and dabbed with water.

The device developed by the researchers is just 2.3 micrometres thick, approximately the length of a red blood cell.

In a paper for the journal Advanced Electronic Materials, the researchers say this new tattoo could be combined with other electronics to do things like emit light when the wearer is dehydrated or needs to move out of the sun to avoid sunburn.

Zalora Hong Kong

The tattoos could also be applied to packaging or fruit to signal when an item is nearing its use-by date.

Glowing tattoos and light-emitting fingernails could also become a trendy fashion accessory, and as OLED technology is printable they could be created in bespoke designs.

“The tattooable OLEDs that we have demonstrated for the first time can be made at scale and very cheaply,” senior author Professor Franco Cacialli said.

“In healthcare they could emit light when there is a change in a patient’s condition – or, if the tattoo was turned the other way into the skin, they could potentially be combined with light-sensitive therapies to target cancer cells, for instance.

“Our proof-of-concept study is the first step. Future challenges will include encapsulating the OLEDs as much as possible to stop them from degrading quickly through contact with air, as well as integrating the device with a battery or supercapacitor.”

Chic Me - World

Senior author Professor Virgilio Mattoli added: “Tattoo electronics is a fast-growing field of research.

“The advantage of this technology is that it is low-cost, easy to apply and use, and washes off easily with soap and water.”

Wearable technology is predicted to become a huge trend in the coming years, with customers potentially able to use their skin as an interface like any other device.

A tattoo wearer might be able to stroke or pinch their skin or to move their finger in circles to instruct the device to perform a task, or to send a signal to a connected smartphone or watch.

They could even replace contactless cards by allowing you to simply scan your arm to pay for things in a shop.

“The wearables you buy today are pretty much all only a reduced smartphone,” Dr Pedro Lopes from the University of Chicago said in 2020.

“You shrink the smartphone display, put it on a wristwatch, and you have it. But what if we take that to the next step. What if these devices can not only read signals from the human body but also intersect and interject signals into the human body?”





Source link

Rosegal
Continue Reading

TECH

A new season of Tech Tonic

Tama Putranto

Published

on

Shaw Academy


The podcast returns on March 1

Chic Me - World

The show that investigates the promises and perils of our digital age is back with a new season. FT innovation editor John Thornhill will take us into the emergency rooms, city centres and even cruise ships where tech innovation is solving some of the unprecedented challenges brought about by the pandemic, as he explores what this tech-driven world means for us all. Tech Tonic returns on Monday, March 1.

Danone

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

A transcript for this podcast is currently unavailable, view our accessibility guide.



Source link

Zalora Hong Kong

Rosegal
Continue Reading

TECH

UK seeks fintech ‘big bang’

Avatar

Published

on

Shaw Academy


Finance and technology go hand in hand in creating successful business environments, as the venture capitalists and tech entrepreneurs of Silicon Valley will testify.

Chic Me - World

With the UK losing trading business to the EU this year due to the lack of a services Brexit agreement, there is pressure to make London a global Spac centre, while today’s Kalifa report on UK fintech aims to maintain Britain’s advantage in combining technology with financial services.

The review, which was launched by chancellor Rishi Sunak at the Budget last March and has been led by former Worldpay chief executive Ron Kalifa, is one of a series commissioned by the government to help strengthen the UK’s position in finance and technology.

Investment is one key point in a five-point plan, with US and Silicon Valley-style funding and entrepreneurial incentives emphasised. The review calls for an expansion of R&D tax credits, the Enterprise Investment Scheme and Venture Capital Trusts. A £1bn “Fintech Growth Fund” is suggested, along with improvements to the listing environment through less of a free float being allowed, along with dual-class shares and the relaxation of pre-emption rights. A family of fintech indices would enhance the sector’s visibility, it advises. Such steps are seen as urgent, with some of Britain’s most promising tech businesses considering US stock market listings.

Danone

Dan Thomas and Nicholas Megaw report a new visa has also been recommended as part of the “digital big bang” needed, enabling access to global talent for tech businesses. The chancellor Rishi Sunak told the FT today he was planning just such a move next week.

Crypto also gets a mention, with the review saying “the UK has the potential to be a leading global centre for the issuance, clearing, settlement, trading and exchange of crypto and digital assets”.

One note of caution comes with the role of the Competition and Markets Authority, with consolidation seen as a necessity to ensure growth of the sector.

“Success brings scale but as some businesses thrive, others inevitably will fail. Some consolidation will therefore be critical in facilitating the growth that UK fintechs need in order to become global champions,” it said.

Zalora Hong Kong

The Internet of (Five) Things

1. US removes roadblock to digital tax
US Treasury secretary Janet Yellen has told G20 finance ministers that Washington will drop a contentious part of its proposal for reform of global digital taxation rules that had been the main stumbling block to an agreement. The move could unlock long-stalled multilateral negotiations at the OECD.

2. Lucid takes on Tesla 
Two years ago, Elon Musk claimed there was no electric car that could compete with Tesla’s Model S. At the time, it was true. But now, Lucid Motors says the wait for a model to match it is almost over. Richard Waters says Lucid’s fundraising highlights how plentiful capital is for new companies — but when times change on Wall Street, many investors may no longer have the patience to go along for the ride.

Lucid aims to unseat Tesla

3. Twitter looks at monetising tweets
Twitter unveiled a range of potential features on Thursday, including tools that would allow users to charge their followers for exclusive content. The social media platform said it was exploring a Super Follows feature, where users could choose to pay certain accounts a subscription fee, as well as tools for tipping.

Daily newsletter

#techFT brings you news, comment and analysis on the big companies, technologies and issues shaping this fastest moving of sectors from specialists based around the world. Click here to get #techFT in your inbox.

Chic Me - World

4. Airbnb bouncing back, DoorDash triples revenues
A Covid collapse in tourism to cities was partly offset at the end of last year by more people travelling to rural destinations, said Airbnb, as it boasted of its “resilience” in its first earnings as a public company. Fourth-quarter revenues were $859m, comfortably higher than analysts’ expectations of $747m. DoorDash’s maiden earnings showed it more than tripled its revenues in the final months of last year, but suggested that demand for home-delivered food would moderate in 2021.

5. Zoom fatigue is real, says study
Researchers at Silicon Valley’s Stanford University have confirmed what millions of remote workers already knew: “Zoom fatigue” causes greater stress than meeting in real life because of the “non-verbal overload” of endless video calls.

Tech tools — AirSelfie AirPix drone

Things have moved on a bit since the selfie-stick was, indeed, a long pole, writes Jonathan Margolis. The latest take isn’t a stick at all, but a pocket-sized drone armed with a camera. AirSelfie’s super-light 52g AirPix (€119.95)) succeeds where other attempts at the technology have stuttered. It packs a 12 megapixel, full-HD camera for stills and video and it works wonderfully. You can steer it using your phone and it can be set to follow you around, by locking on to your face. Best of all, it contains a sensor that means you can control it by gesture.



Source link

Rosegal
Continue Reading

TECH

‘Zoom fatigue’ brought into focus by Stanford study

Avatar

Published

on

Shaw Academy


Researchers at Silicon Valley’s Stanford University have confirmed what millions of remote workers already knew: “Zoom fatigue” causes greater stress than meeting in real life because of the “non-verbal overload” of endless video calls.

Chic Me - World

A study by Jeremy Bailenson, professor of communication and founding director of the Stanford Virtual Human Interaction Lab, found that the underlying causes of Zoom fatigue include “excessive amounts of close-up eye gaze” and “increased self-evaluation from staring at video of oneself”.

Zoom users are seeing reflections of themselves at a frequency and duration that hasn’t been seen before in the history of media — and likely the history of people,” Bailenson wrote.

Some of these problems could be solved with “trivial changes” to Zoom’s user interface, he suggested, such as automatically hiding the “selfie” window that reflects the user back at themselves after the first few seconds of a call.

Danone

Bailenson also recommends that Zoom users themselves can make simple changes to reduce the strain, such as shrinking the size of the video window so that other faces do not feel so close.

More video meetings should simply be conducted as phone calls, he added.

Bailenson’s new paper, published this week in the journal Technology, Mind and Behavior, is billed by Stanford as the “first peer-reviewed article that systematically deconstructs Zoom fatigue from a psychological perspective”.

It is accompanied by a separate study, not yet peer reviewed, that uses a “Zoom Exhaustion and Fatigue” scale to measure the impact. After thousands of people completed a questionnaire, Bailenson said there was a “strong theoretical reason to predict” that women are more affected than men by seeing video of themselves all day.

Zalora Hong Kong

Millions of knowledge workers around the world have now spent the best part of year in spare bedrooms and home offices, as the pandemic and waves of lockdowns forced office closures.

Video conferencing apps such as Zoom, Microsoft Teams and Google Meet have boomed as a result. Zoom’s share price has almost quadrupled in the last year, giving it a market value of more than $100bn.

Bailenson says he thinks that Zoom is “awesome” and “works fantastically” but has become a “punching bag” for frustrated office workers. “We can’t control a lot of our lives but we can yell about Zoom,” he said in an interview with the FT.

He acknowledged that the problems of Zoom fatigue pale in comparison with the daily trauma faced by medical staff in overloaded hospitals. Even in developed countries, millions of people lack access to reliable broadband connections and many cannot afford the hardware required to make video calls.

Nonetheless, the Stanford research underlines the mental burden of being forced to sit in front of a camera and stare at screens filled with faces — including our own.

“On Zoom, behaviour ordinarily reserved for close relationships — such as long stretches of direct eye gaze and faces seen close up — has suddenly become the way we interact with casual acquaintances, coworkers, and even strangers,” Bailenson wrote.

Bailenson said he had tried to speak to Zoom about his findings but was “still waiting for that meeting to be scheduled”.



Source link

Rosegal
Continue Reading
Advertisement Rentcars.com

Recent Posts

Advertisement CheapOAir
Advertisement ADCOS

Popular