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Hong Kong's Ray Cordeiro, 'world's most durable DJ', retires at 96

Hong Kong's Ray Cordeiro, 'world's most durable DJ', retires at 96
Hong Kong's Ray Cordeiro, 'world's most durable DJ', retires at 96



“Well that’s it,” says Ray Cordeiro in his final radio show, after more than 70 years in broadcasting.

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US President Joe Biden ‘breaks royal protocol’ as he meets the Queen at G7

US President Joe Biden ‘breaks royal protocol’ as he meets the Queen at G7
US President Joe Biden ‘breaks royal protocol’ as he meets the Queen at G7


Joe Biden appeared to break royal protocol during his first meeting with the Queen at the G7 summit by arriving after her.

The US President’s motorcade swept into the dinner reception during the summit in Cornwall on Friday (June 11).

But he arrived with First Lady Jill Biden a few minutes after the Queen got there with Prince William, Kate Middleton,Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles.

According to royal protocol, members of the Royal Family should be the last to arrive at an event and the first to leave.

The protocol dictates that all guests are in place before the Queen arrives.



US President Joe Biden ‘breaks royal protocol’ as he meets the Queen at G7
Joe Biden met the Queen at the G7 summit

British professional coaching company Debrett’s told the Daily Mail: “It is correct for everyone to arrive before the royal personage and protocol rules dictate that no guest should leave an event before a member of the Royal Family.”

Royal historian Marlene Koenig, royal historian told Bazaar back in 2019: “When it is a formal event, a state dinner, attending the ballet (sitting in the royal box), a reception, a wedding, the royals are the last to arrive.”



Under royal protocol, guests should arrive before the Queen
Royal protocol states all guests arrive before the royals



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But the late arrival at the Eden Project near St Austell, Cornwall did not appear to put a dampener on the monarch’s enthusiasm.

The Queen, 95, was all smiles as she spoke to the American leader and his wife.

It was the first time she has met a foreign leader since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic.

And the reception also marked her first official engagement since her husband, Prince Philip, died in April aged 99.



The G7 is in Cornwall
The leaders of the world’s richest nations have descended on Cornwall

The Bidens are due to visit Windsor Castle on Sunday for tea.

The G7 summit has seen the leaders of seven of the world’s richest countries visit Cornwall.

It also saw the first meeting between the US President and Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

Meanwhile, Kate was asked about Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s newborn daughter Lilibet at the G7 summit.

She said: “We haven’t met her yet but hopefully that will be soon.”





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ALEX BRUMMER: Good governance in corporate life is far off

ALEX BRUMMER: Good governance in corporate life is far off
ALEX BRUMMER: Good governance in corporate life is far off


ALEX BRUMMER: The fight for good governance and better value systems in corporate life has a long way to go

Founding a new enterprise is hard. The start-up generation has had a real chance to lift the bar when it comes to looking after the interests of employees. 

Similarly, it might have been hoped that Covid-19, the suffering of so many, and the push for environmental, social and governance investing by Blackrock among others, might have produced a real change in boardroom behaviour. 

Instead, we have seen unfettered greed, with bosses lobbying for, and accepting, big pay increases when restraint and responsibility are in order. 

Among newer enterprises, think about craft brewing. The name itself exhibits a point of difference with the established industrial-scale beerage. There, the conformity of the product and logistics play second fiddle to the quality of hops. 

ALEX BRUMMER: Good governance in corporate life is far off

Sinking feeling: It might have been hoped that Covid-19 might have produced a real change in boardroom behaviour

Brewdog is one of the more successful of the craft breed and tapped into respect for what it does by crowdfunding. So it comes as a shock when former workers take to Twitter exposing a record of cutting corners on health and safety and driving staff so hard that it has caused mental illness. 

Uber had to be dragged through the UK courts to be persuaded that its drivers in the UK should be offered the same employment rights as payroll employees. 

The lack of formal employment conditions for riders was among the factors that led to a stock market flop of Deliveroo. Instead of resetting the dial for workers, some millennial and GenZ firms seem to have feeble grasp of what a company built for all stakeholders might look like. 

It doesn’t help that bigger firms set a bad example. Dismal conditions in Sports Direct and Amazon warehouses have been widely reported. Tesco fought an equal pay claim for women to the highest court in Europe and lost. Its former chief executive, Dave Lewis, waltzed off with a £6.42m pay and bonus package during the pandemic. 

Shareholders in rival Morrisons this week handed chief executive Dave Potts and his team bloody noses, with 70 per cent voting against the group’s pay report. It has been a year of executive pay revolts at companies as different as Rio Tinto and publisher Informa. 

Supermarkets were among the pandemic heroes, keeping people supplied. That is no excuse for ‘wartime’ profiteering. Investors at Morrisons were disturbed that the pay committee failed to adjust bonuses to account for windfall income as a result of hospitality and other closures. 

Fat cat pay is no accident. It arises as a result of weak remuneration committees, grasping executives with no sense of personal shame and lack of responsibility and poor advice from remuneration experts who are often conflicted. The fight for good governance and better value systems in corporate life has a long way to go.

Trading places 

Post-Brexit Britain’s trade figures have become a new battleground for those who thought leaving the EU was a dreadful mistake. With each passing month the pattern becomes clearer. 

Post-Brexit Britain's trade figures have become a new battleground for those who thought leaving the EU was a dreadful mistake

Post-Brexit Britain’s trade figures have become a new battleground for those who thought leaving the EU was a dreadful mistake

Trade with countries outside the EU is buoyant with imports up 4.9 per cent since December and exports off just 1.3 per cent. Trade with Europe is being hit hard. 

The UK, by all accounts, is getting the best of the bargain with exports down 5.7 per cent and imports falling by a whopping 19.1 per cent. 

The figures are distorted by pandemic effects and the relatively slow recovery in the eurozone. In spite of border disputes and EU use of non-tariff barriers, such as intrusive document requests, living outside the EU is not the disaster predicted.

Private grief 

At least fund management outsourcer Sanne did not capitulate at the first sound of private equity cannon fire. 

By holding firm, chairman Rupert Robson, an HSBC emigre, has elicited five improved offers and only succumbed to talks when the offer from Cinven hit 875p, valuing the group at £1.42million. The final outcome will be the same. A valuable UK financial enterprise with good tech vanishing into the private equity black box. 

There is a symmetry to Jersey-based Sanne’s fate. Before its London listing in 2015, it was owned by private equity outfit Inflexion. Much of its income derives from offering the private equity sector fiduciary, administration and governance services. 

Private equity takeovers should never just be about price. 

Unless a compelling and ambitious business case can be made, the directors have a duty to kick the offer into touch. 



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Horror as boy, 3, dies after falling 10ft from window before being mauled by dogs

Horror as boy, 3, dies after falling 10ft from window before being mauled by dogs
Horror as boy, 3, dies after falling 10ft from window before being mauled by dogs


A three-year-old boy has died after plunging 10ft from a window before being savaged by his family’s dogs, according to reports.

The toddler was found in a critical condition with a neck injury from the fall at his home in Elizabeth, New Jersey in the US.

He also had bites on his body from being mauled by the two dogs in the back yard of the house.

The child, who has not been named, was taken to hospital after being found at around 5.30pm on Wednesday (June 9). He died an hour later.

Neighbours claimed as soon as he fell, the dogs attacked him.



Horror as boy, 3, dies after falling 10ft from window before being mauled by dogs
The family’s home, where the tragedy unfolded

Authorities arrived and found the two dogs, which neighbours said were pit bulls, in the fenced-in back garden.

The animals were taken away by a local animal control agency and are expected to be euthanised, according to NJ.com.

It is not clear whether the boy died as a result of the fall, the injuries from the dog attack, or as a combination of both.



He died an hour after falling
He was taken to hospital but died an hour later

And it is also not clear how he fell from the window.

Police are investigating but no criminal charge shave been filed.

Neighbour Maria Rocha told CBS New York: “The dogs were bad, the dogs, everybody was scared of the dogs.

“As soon as the baby fell, the dogs attack him.

“My heart is broken. I didn’t sleep all night.



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“I cannot believe this happened.”

Another woman who lives nearby described seeing a man run to the front of the property carrying the boy.

She said:“I heard something like bang and then I heard someone was screaming like, ‘Help! No stop, no stop!’

Another resident described the animals as being aggressive, adding they would jump and bark when she waled past the home.





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Tycoon dubbed Britain’s answer to Elon Musk set to be billionaire

Tycoon dubbed Britain’s answer to Elon Musk set to be billionaire
Tycoon dubbed Britain’s answer to Elon Musk set to be billionaire


Tycoon dubbed Britain’s answer to Elon Musk set to become a billionaire when his flying taxi start-up floats in New York

A tycoon dubbed Britain’s answer to Elon Musk is set to become a billionaire when his flying taxi start-up floats in New York. 

Stephen Fitzpatrick, 43, founded Vertical Aerospace in 2016 and will see his stake valued at more than £700m when it lists on the stock market. He also owns a £600m stake in energy giant Ovo, which he founded, taking his overall wealth to well over £1billion. 

He is a former banker and Conservative Party donor who has been likened to Tesla boss Musk. 

Tycoon dubbed Britain’s answer to Elon Musk set to be billionaire

Britain’s Elon Musk: Stephen Fitzpatrick founded Vertical Aerospace in 2016 and will see his stake valued at more than £700m when it lists on the stock market

The Belfast-born businessman started Ovo in 2009 and led the firm through a takeover of rival SSE, Britain’s second-biggest supplier, a decade later. At a London party to mark its tenth birthday, compere Lauren Laverne claimed Ovo was ‘hoping to redefine the limits of human progress’. 

Vertical Aerospace, which counts Rolls-Royce and American Airlines among its backers, is set to float in New York by reversing into a special purpose acquisition company (Spac) in a £1.6billion deal. 

The Bristol firm is developing electrically-powered aircraft, which take off and land vertically, designed to travel almost silently at cruise speeds of 200 miles per hour, carrying four passengers. 

So far Vertical has orders for up to 1,000 aircraft from Avolon and American Airlines, worth around £2.8billion. Europe’s top regulator said last month the region could see the first flying taxis enter service by 2024, with Vertical set to begin test flights later this year. The deal is expected to close in the second half of 2021.



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G7 summit: Joe Biden gifts Boris Johnson custom-made bike

G7 summit: Joe Biden gifts Boris Johnson custom-made bike
G7 summit: Joe Biden gifts Boris Johnson custom-made bike



The red, white and blue machine was built in record time by a Philadelphia business with four staff.

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Apprentice flop rejected by Dragons Den now runs a £16m business and drives a Ferrari

Apprentice flop rejected by Dragons Den now runs a £16m business and drives a Ferrari
Apprentice flop rejected by Dragons Den now runs a £16m business and drives a Ferrari


Alex Mills, made famous on The Apprentice for his unforgettable eyebrows, has gone on to found a company now worth £16m.

He’s just made the 2021 Sunday Times Rich List and splashed out on a Ferrari the second he could afford one.

His insurance start-up Dynamo Cover is set to top sales of £15m this year but he said he won’t rest until he’s built a skyscraper in Cardiff’s city centre, Wales Online reports.

It seems Lord Sugar’s parting advice to the ambitious Welshman, who made the final seven in The Apprentice 2013 series, has finally come good: “I think you’re a young, enthusiastic chap…try and stick to something…and you’re going to succeed.”

The entrepreneur was rejected from Dragons Den before he was accepted on The Apprentice.



Apprentice flop rejected by Dragons Den now runs a £16m business and drives a Ferrari
Alex on The Apprentice, where his eyebrows and authentic personality found fame

He said it wasn’t his stint on The Apprentice that made him successful but rather a string of defeats that have given him focus ever since he was an unconfident schoolboy at Cowbridge Comprehensive School.

Alex said: “I would still have that same story but not as many people would know about it,” he said about his appearance on the primetime BBC show, which paid him just £1,500.

“I wasn’t interested in being famous. It was a great once-in-a-lifetime experience but I don’t think it’s a career booster. I’m where I am in life because of my work ethic and drive – not because I was on telly.”



Alex is a keen gardener in his spare time with a penchant for manicured lawns
Alex is a keen gardener in his spare time with a penchant for manicured lawns

Alex was booted off The Appentice, which he said was “horrible”.

“I didn’t have anything to go back to – no job, no business,” he said. He went to work security night shifts at a Cardiff hotel – mostly to hide from unwanted attention while he regrouped and licked his wounds.

“I was supposed to be a successful businessman,” he said. “Instead I was working nights at a hotel. My fiancée tells me I beat myself up. If things aren’t going well I tell myself that was a direct consequence of my actions.”



Alex, stood outside his home he jokingly calls Mills Manor, is 'unashamedly ambitious'
Alex, stood outside his home he jokingly calls Mills Manor, is ‘unashamedly ambitious’

But he soon picked himself up, with his savings and investment he decided to set up his own insurance company – aiming for the bicycle market – on his kitchen table with a soundtrack of generic office background sounds playing on repeat.

But it wasn’t until an angel investor, Welsh businessman Stephen Jenkins, offered to invest in him that Alex was able to break into the industry.

“It wasn’t a lot of money but I couldn’t have started up without Steve or the belief he put back in me,” Alex said. He worked all day and night because “someone had given me £15,000 and I didn’t have it to give it back to him”.



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Dynamo Cover launched in 2017 generating £30,000 of turnover in the first month. After 12 weeks Alex bought his first supercar.

“I’m unashamedly ambitious,” Alex continued earnestly. “I love cars. If I want it, I’ll get it. Just sitting down saying I want something isn’t enough. It’s how do I strategise to get it?”

The business has now gone from zero to £16m in just three years and Alex said he wants to compete with the biggest insurance giants.





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